2017 Recipients

​Anna-Mari Almila

​Anna-Mari Almila

London College of Fashion, London, UK

Anna-Mari Almila is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in Sociology of Fashion at London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London. She writes in the fields of cultural, global and historical sociology, and her topics range from historical/political construction of urban spaces, materiality of dress and globalized fashion, and the history of fashion studies, to gendered wine and food mediation and mediatization. She is the author of Veiling in Fashion: Space and the Hijab in Minority Communities (2017 in press, I.B. Tauris) and the editor of The Routledge International Handbook to Veils and Veiling Practices (2017 in press).

Malaika Cunningham

Malaika Cunningham

University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Malaika is a theatre practitioner and PhD candidate based at the University of Leeds working within the Centre for Understanding Sustainable Prosperity with Professor Kate Oakley. Her research focus is the role of theatre within political and social change. She is currently exploring the potential role for theatre practice within the political discourse and policy reviews post-Brexit, with a specific focus on environmental policy. She is interested in bringing together her work as a theatre maker and her academic background in Politics within this project. Alongside her academic work she is Artistic Director of The Bare Project theatre company. She is also a facilitator with Cardboard Citizens, and works with interactive arts company, Invisible Flock.

Janine Irvine

Janine Irvine

Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

Janine Irvine is a PhD (English) candidate at Massey University, New Zealand. Janine has worked as a life writer practitioner with a group called Time of Your Life and co-written a collection of stories. She also worked alongside the Rakaia community (South Island) to record, write and publish their community history. Participation in this community-driven, interdisciplinary collaborative process prompted her return to academic studies. Janine embarked on a PhD journey to explore how geographic communities in Aotearoa New Zealand research and write their own local history as a means to preserve their story. In her earlier career, Janine trained and worked as a development researcher in South Africa.

Harnoor Bhangu

Harnoor Bhangu

University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Canada

Harnoor Bhangu received her Bachelor of Arts in History of Art from University of Winnipeg, where she is currently working on her Master of Arts in Cultural Studies: Curatorial Practices. She focuses primarily on South East Asian, Central Asian and Middle-Eastern artists who interrogate gender, religion and diaspora in their work. After the completion of this program, she intends to pursue a PhD in contemporary Islamic Art.

Maryam Rashidi

Maryam Rashidi

Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

Maryam Rashidi is currently completing her PhD research with Research School of Humanities and the Arts, Australian National University (but lives in Paris permanently since mid-2016). Her thesis investigates the mutual contributions of art practice and social research based on multiple fieldworks and case studies of artists’ social engagements in Europe, Asia, North America and Australia. She has conducted additional research with the Culture Section of UNESCO (Paris, 2012-13) and, since, independently persuaded the research, on the role of culture in sustainable development. She has presented the results of various stages of each of these in numerous international conferences and is currently preparing them for publication.

Donlisha Moahi

Donlisha Moahi

Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Donlisha Moahi holds a Masters’ in Visual Art (Art Education) and a BA in Visual Art (Visual Communication Design) from the Visual Arts Department at Stellenbosch University, Western Cape South Africa, where she is currently pursuing a PhD in Visual Arts. She also graduated with a teaching Diploma from Hillside Teachers’ College, Zimbabwe. Her professional experience includes teaching Art at Junior Secondary School level in Botswana. Her research explores to what extent art processes can facilitate open, safe spaces where, through dialogue, stereotypes and stigmas can be negotiated. She was a recipient of the Strategic Merit Award in her academic career.

Rebecca Neale

Rebecca Neale

Durham University, Durham, UK

Rebecca D. A. Neale is a doctoral student in the department of Theology and Religion at Durham University, whose current research involves feminist anthropology, the visual aesthetic of religion and art as a source of ethnography. Rebecca’s recent MSc which was conducted at the University of Oxford alongside working as a Religious Studies teacher in the UK, focused on the role of art as an epistemological and experiential source for engagement with religion. Her research interests therefore include religious education, religious visual culture, gender studies and the intersection of art, religion and society.

Rémy Jarry

Rémy Jarry

Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Rémy Jarry is a PhD Candidate at the China Academy of Art, researching on Chinese contemporary art under the supervision of Prof. Gao Shiming. A French national, he has been serving in the role of Lecturer in the Faculty of Communication Arts at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok since 2015. Rémy holds 4 Master’s degrees from Sorbonne University, Paris respectively in Art History (valedictorian), Journalism, Marketing & Communication and Business Administration (MBA). Fluent in French, English and Chinese, he had been working for renowned art galleries and auction houses in both Europe and Asia.

Seulkee Kang

Seulkee Kang

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, South Korea

Seulkee Kang received her Bachelor of Arts degrees in Art History and English Literature from Ewha Womans University, South Korea. She is currently a Master’s candidate at the Graduate School of Culture Technology, KAIST, South Korea. As a member of Emotion Technology Lab, Seulkee conducts research on how lines influence emotional response to art especially in Georges Seurat’s paintings and explores interdisciplinary perspectives to determine the impact of lines in various fields. Based on her previous research experience, she aims to study 19th and 20th century art and begin a comparative research of emotional lines in Eastern and Western arts.

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Charlotte Tegan

Charlotte Tegan

Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Charlotte Tegan is a photomedia artist, and PhD Candidate with the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia. Her current research is an investigation into the ways in which creativity is affected by ambivalent entanglement and perpetual connection to digital devices. Previous research has focused on the museum sector and the role of mobile applications in education and visitor experiences. Charlotte has previously worked in children’s education within museums, and now teaches in the Creative Industries Faculty at the Queensland University of Technology. Her photomedia work has been featured in a number of recent exhibitions around Australia.

Sarah Richardson

Sarah Richardson

University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

Sarah Harvey Richardson is a PhD candidate in the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds. Her research is concerned with the concept of ‘audiences’ and audience engagement and development practices in art galleries; in particular an exploration of the juncture between the theoretical and the practical, influenced by her work in gallery education. Sarah is also a member of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, and an Education Outreach Fellow in Art History and Art Gallery and Museums Studies for the University of Leeds.

Annchen Bronkowski

Annchen Bronkowski

University of London, London, UK

Annchen is currently an Art History Masters candidate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, with a focus on African art. Before studying at SOAS, she completed a MA in Museum Studies at University College London, a postgraduate Honours degree in Curatorship at the University of Cape Town and a got her Bachelors with Honours in Fine Arts (interdisciplinary practice) at Stellenbosch University, South Africa. Her research interests include African Art, Museology, Art History pedagogy and the boundaries of the archive. When she is not chasing academic deadlines, she is thinking about a way to expand and diversify African art archives.

Clare Massey

Clare Massey

North of England Consortium for Arts and Humanities, Hull, UK

Clare Massey is a visual artist and educator based in Manchester UK with a profound interest in domestic photography as a cultural artefact. Using methods of appropriation, extraction, and intervention her work examines how we make and use images as a culture. Funded by the Arts Council of England, her current PhD research reflects on Instagram as contemporary practice discussing its origins and transformations. It demonstrates that visual culture is always active and in progress, negotiated through a complex temporal relationship, observed in the present, referring to the past yet facing the future.

Ilinca Damian

Ilinca Damian

University of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania

Ilinca Damian works as Art Conservator at the National Museum of Art of Romania, department Museum of Art Collections. She recently defended her PhD thesis in Philosophy, area of research Anthropology of Art, at the University of Bucharest. Other studies include a BA in Art Conservation and Restoration at the National University of Arts, MA in History of Art and Philosophy of Culture. During her PhD program she received a scholarship from the Romanian Academy and she undertook research stages at the University of Vienna and University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki. She received the Graduate Scholar Award at the Tenth International Conference on the Arts in Society, held at Imperial College, London. Her work is focused on research regarding artistic practice and techniques, collection making, and art conservation methodologies. Her academic interests are in the area of philosophy of art with a focus on mind, meaning making and image making. The current presentation in the conference deals with defining artistic practice as being closer to scientific practice in the sense that both help not by defining or understanding the world, but actually by inventing it. The invention of reality is made through similar processes for both visual arts and science.

Ines Morais

Ines Morais

Nova University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal

Inês Morais is a Phd student from Nova University, Lisbon, Portugal whose current research involves with the importance of communication strategies in museums of difficult memories. Inês has a MSc in Communication, Culture ad New Technologies which was conducted at ISCTE, Lisbon, Portugal alongside working as a communication professional, researcher and teacher in Nova University in Portugal and in the Polytechnic Institute Rising Sun of Huambo, Angola. Inês presented papers in Germany, Spain, Greece, United Kingdom and United States. Her research interests therefore include communication, culture, arts, society.

​Ninette Rothmüller

​Ninette Rothmüller

Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, USA

Ninette Rothmüller is a visiting lecturer in the Department of Dance at Smith College and a research associate at the Five College Women’s Studies Research Center at Mount Holyoke College, where she leads an interdisciplinary practice-led research project called ‘Undisciplined Interactions’. Her interdisciplinary ABD PhD project is located at the University of Osnabrück, Germany. Ninette is a practicing artist and interdisciplinary theorist. Her research focuses on embodied knowledge production processes and perceptual intelligence and draws amongst others on voices from philosophy of the body and embodiment, cultural studies, performance studies, movement studies, and art. She is interested in investigating modes of enhancing public access to joint processes of knowledge production through embodied and/or artistic forms of knowledge inquiry, as well as by means of the creative activation of architectural sites through participatory creative interventions. Drawing on works by, for example, Henri Lefebvre and Julia Brauch, her work frames time and space as social conditions and constructs. As such, they are both vulnerable and open to change and interpretation through social gestures, acts of creating and embodied inquiry.

Kyla Searle

Kyla Searle

Brown University, Providence, USA

Kyla Searle is an artist, educator and producer. Searle has over ten years experience in inquiry-based arts pedagogy. Her work as a dramaturg has been developed at New Dramatists, La Mama ETC, Soho Rep and the Institute for Arts and Civic Dialogue; for her dramaturgy on Daniel Alexander Jones' Duat she received awards from the Kennedy Center and the O'Neill Center. She holds degrees in Urban Studies and Public Health (UCLA), and Interdisciplinary Studies (NYU); she is currently completing an MFA in Playwriting at Brown University. RESIDUE is her latest play, an investigation of the East Bay Area where she was born and raised.